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Oldest artworks and instruments

Wildpferd aus der Vogelherdhöhle (Hildegard Jensen, Uni Tübingen)Some of humankind’s earliest works of art and instruments were discovered in the area of Blaubeuren, Ulm and Niederstotzingen on the Swabian Alb. They were created during the last Ice Age and are nearly 40.000 years old. Most of these artworks are ivory carvings. The fact that the ivory carvings usually depict animals indicates their great importance for survival as well as for the spiritual world of Ice Age people. There are many different possible interpretations of these carvings. Some suggest they played a role in hunting rituals, while others argue they may have been components of shamanistic practices.


Important finds are:

Venus from Hohle Fels
Made of mammoth ivory, oldest female figurine in the world, discovered in 2008, Approx. 35 - 40,000 years old
Discovery site: Hohle Fels, Ach valley near Schelklingen

 
Löwenmensch aus dem Hohlenstein Stadel (T. Stephan, Ulmer Museum)Lion man
Ivory figure, around 32,000 years old, combining both animal and human Characteristics
Discovery site: Hohlenstein-Stadel, Lone valley


Knochenflöte aus dem Geißenklöstere (Hildegard Jensen, Universität Tübingen)Flute
Made of swan bones, around 36,000 years old, oldest musical instrument in the world
Discovery site: Geißenklösterle,, Ach valley near Blaubeuren

Mammoth
First completely preserved ivory figure, around 32,000 years old, discovered in 2007
Discovery site: Vogelherd Cave in Lone valley


Wasservogel vom Hohle Fels (Hildegard Jensen, Universität Tübingen)Water bird
Oldest representation of a bird in the world, made of mammoth ivory, around 33,000 years old
Discovery site: Hohle Fels, Ach valley near Schelklingen

 
Wild horse
Made of ivory, around 32,000 years old
Discovery site: Vogelherd Cave in Lone valley